• This series of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) addresses commonly asked questions about the relationship between aquaculture and the environment. We discuss U.S. laws and regulations that exist to protect the marine environment as well as specific questions that often are raised about aquaculture’s potential impact. If you have a question or concern that is not addressed here, contact us. (04/15/17)
  • I’ve been duped.

    Years ago, I saw an exposé on the evils of farm-raised salmon. Since that time, I have dutifully shelled out three to four times the cost of farmed-raised salmon to buy wild to keep my family safe from toxins, heavy metals and parasites. (04/15/17)
  • The Scottish Salmon Producers’ Organisation has updated its guide for fish farm developers on engagement with the planning process and the procedures to follow when seeking to operate in Scotland. (04/10/17)
  • Norwegian farmed salmon has a lower level of environmental pollutants than the country’s wild salmon, according to a new study. (03/28/17)
  • A MAJOR study in Norway has found that wild salmon contains more contaminants than farmed salmon, reversing a popular held view that it was the other way around. But neither are harmful to health, it is being stressed. (03/28/17)
  • The Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in late April that Pacific Seafood Group's steelhead trout farm on the Columbia River is the United States' first steelhead trout or salmon farm to achieve Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification. Operated by Pacific Seafood's Pacific Aquaculture division, the farm is located in Nespelem, Wash., on the Colville Nation, in northeastern Washington state. Pacific Seafood purchased the farm in 2008 but partners with the Colville Nation to operate it; most farm employees are members of the Colville Nation. (04/29/13)
  • It's time to make more productive use of the sea, says John Forster. What should we expect from marine aquaculture in the future? Will it serve simply to top up supplies of fish and shellfish from capture fisheries, as it does now and as is mostly assumed, or does it promise something more? (01/04/11)
  • Washington State is engaged in numerous efforts to protect biodiversity, preserve habitat and restore the Puget Sound ecosystem. One important element in these proposals is being largely overlooked, the restoration of marine fish stocks to historical or sustainable levels. Because of their longer life cycle, age at reproduction, and fecundity based on size at spawning, recovery of marine fish solely by natural means will take decades. Continued impacts from human activities including projected population growth in the Puget Sound region will militate against natural recovery. Marine fish enhancement may be an important tool in restoring some of these depleted stocks more quickly, particularly before those most impaired drop below sustainable and recoverable levels. Intervention sooner may allow us to preserve and protect some critical sub-groups and allele frequencies that are the most threatened. (01/01/10)
  • The Demarketing of Farmed Salmon by 35 Environmental Organizations in the United States and Canada. Demarketing farmed salmon: Shifting consumer demand away........ Health authorities recommend eating oily, ocean fish on a weekly basis, including farmed salmon. Quite the opposite, leading environmental organizations (ENGOs) in North America say that because of high levels of PCBs, the "maximum number of safe meals" of farmed salmon is half a meal per month and for young children, zero meals. (06/27/07)
  • A number of areas of interest were raised at the Special Committee on Sustainable Aquaculture Nanaimo session. Anyone with an interest in these topics may find the following information useful. (06/14/06)